Venice Guide and Boat

Foreigners in Venice private guided tour about Dalmatians and Greeks in Venice
Scuola degli SchiavoniForeingers in Venice tour to discover CarpaccioCarpaccio's paintings are full of details - discover them with Foreigners in Venice tourVisit the impressive Orthodox church in Venice with Foreigners in Venice tourForeigners in Venice tour to discover the Orthodox church of Saint George in Venice

Foreigners in Venice

170,00 270,00 

Foreigners in Venice private guided tour  is about  how in the past Venice offered the possibility to many foreign communities to set up in Venice in order to ensure profitable business with different area of the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Foreigners  gradually integrated with the Venetian society and left their testimony in the City.

First available date: 23 03 2018
SKU: FCV Categories: ,

Product Description

How many were the Foreigners in Venice in the past?

Venice was the centre of international trading and Foreigners in Venice were many since the earliest days. The Dalmatians were among the first to establish important trading relations with Venice. Soon the entire Eastern coastal region of the Adriatic sea fell under the control of the Republic of Venice. The Dalmatians living in Venice,  known as “Schiavoni” (from Slavs), founded their headquarter in the district of Castello in 1451.

The Scuola dei Dalmati is one of the five fraternities survived to Napoleon’s abolitions, and it still preserves the lovely historical building decorated with one of the most interesting cycles of story-telling paintings by Carpaccio. The paintings concentrate on episodes from the lives of their three patron Saints, and are defined as “orientalist” because of the peculiar distinctly middle-eastern looking landscapes.

Another large community of foreigners in Venice was that of the Greeks. When Venice gained control over the islands of Corfu and Crete, following the fourth Crusade (1204), many Greek sailors and traders started to migrate to Venice.

With the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453 their number increased rapidly. At the end of the 15th C. they obtained the permission to build an Orthodox church, the oldest one in the West, and a new seat for their Scuola, which today contains the most precious collection of Icons in Western Europe.

DURATION: 2 hours


  • the service of a certified tour guide
  • admissions to the Scuola Dalmata
  • admission to the Museum of Icons

Additional Information

No. of People

1-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12